Fergie’s Recovery, Sort Of

Fergie’s Recovery, Sort Of

Fergie performing with Black Eyed Peas at Outs...

    While Fergie recently shared her gratitude about recovering from her methamphetamine addiction, she also claims she still drinks and is choosing “her own way of recovery.”  Not only is this counter-intuitive, it’s misleading. She credits “luck, hypnotherapy, exercise, and willpower” for her success, but she also claims her “recovery” remains a battle. It wouldn’t be if she wasn’t attached to one aspect of her addiction.
    Celebrity and fame are not exactly the ideal place to deal with addiction: with one’s life under the microscope, the unfortunate fact is, not everyone peering through is equipped to deal with, process, and act as a support for a life of recovery. For instance, a relapse in a 12-step program is typically viewed with compassion and support is provided; as a celebrity, that same relapse might be viewed on the 6:00 news or exploited across the pages of a tabloid. Ironically, that same celebrity phenomena comes with an inadvertent level of responsibility: their actions, both positive and negative, are in the spotlight and can unintentionally act as behavioral guideposts for adolescents who are already in flux.
    So, if the 12 steps ask us to admit we’re “powerlessness over alcohol (etc) and our lives have become unmanageable,” then admitting powerlessness over some substances while continuing to dabble in others clearly isn’t part of the program. In fact, it’s not an admission of powerlessness at all. It’s denial and a display of the ego gone awry. Crackheads can’t drink alcohol, and alcoholics can’t smoke crack, right? So, why would a methamphetamine addict be able to drink alcohol? They can’t! It’s the antithesis of the fundamental foundation of a 12-step model, not to mention, self-defeating. From the perspective of recovery, commentary like this can be frightening. It represents a very public example of someone not doing things in a way that’s supported in the recovery community.  It exemplifies self-will, and it discourages one from facing the problems arising from ego and addiction itself.
   How is your own recovery positively or negatively effected by claims like this? Discussion is encouraged!

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